Celebrating the Unsung Heroes

Recognize This! – We cannot forget to celebrate the contributions and successes of those in the organization whose greatest successes are rarely visible.

I’m having computer issues today. As I’m sure everyone reading can attest, nothing can destroy your productivity or plan for your day than computer issues. Indeed, computer issues are why this post is being put up so late.

I’m lucky, though. I work with an incredible IT support team who not only know what they’re doing, but also understand the urgency of “my” issue. I say “my” issue because I’m fully aware that while fixing my computer issues are my first priority, I’m sure it isn’t the first priority for the IT team. I know they had a list of tasks to accomplish and goals to achieve when they walked in the office door this morning, and fixing my computer wasn’t on it.

Yet, they’ve made my priority their priority as well (and I am deeply grateful). This situation also gives me the opportunity to emphasize a very important element of strategic employee recognition – don’t forget your supporting cast.

The IT team is fundamentally critical to a well-run organization. Yet, when they are doing their job well, you don’t see or hear them. They keep our systems quietly humming along. Because of this, they are often the unsung heroes of an organization. Today, I’m singing their praises.

This situation was also reflected back to me in a post from Steve Boese on his HR Technology blog:

“We study and ponder and measure and opine about engagement, motivation, performance, blah blah blah. Honestly, it’s all getting kind of boring. Managers and leaders, (and certainly employees), simply remembering that the organization is composed of actual living, breathing, feeling, and caring people, and occasionally acting upon that realization is probably in the long run more important to the success of organizations and our ability to feel like we are doing the right thing with our lives.”

Who are the unsung heroes in your organization? Who understands your priorities and makes them their own?

 

Derek Irvine

About Derek Irvine

The VP of Client Strategy and Consulting at Globoforce, Derek Irvine is one of the world’s foremost experts on employee recognition and engagement, helping business leaders set a higher vision and ambition for their organizations. As a renowned speaker and co-author of "The Power of Thanks" and "Winning with a Culture of Recognition," he teaches companies how to use recognition to proactively manage company culture. Derek holds a B.Comm and Masters of Business Studies from the Smurfit Graduate Business School at University College Dublin.

5 Responses

  1. […] reach – You must target 80-90% of your employees for recognition. You cannot focus on just your top 10% of high performers and expect to generate this kind of big […]

  2. […] reach – You must target 80-90% of your employees for recognition. You cannot focus on just your top 10% of high performers and expect to generate this kind of big […]

  3. […] reach – You must target 80-90% of your employees for recognition. You cannot focus on just your top 10% of high performers and expect to generate this kind of big […]

  4. […] reach – You must target 80-90 percent of your employees for recognition. You cannot focus on just your top 10% of high performers and expect to generate this kind of big […]

  5. […] (And readers know I’m a strong advocate for strategic, social recognition programs that open the opportunity for recognition to all […]

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