Lynette Silva - Author Archive

WorkHuman: Disconnect and Recharge

by Lynette Silva

Ambassador cheetah, VelvetRecognize This! – Humans are designed to need to recharge. Work often is not.

What does it mean to be human? A significant part of being human requires shutting off. We need deep sleep for our brains to clear out all the muck, process the day and file it away in long-term memory, and reset for the next day.

Humans need to recharge.

France codified the need to recharge into law, making the “right to disconnect” a requirement for companies with more than 50 employees. (I recommend this post by Tim Leberecht on “Is the ‘Right to Disconnect’ a Human Right?”)

Research on the business impact of making time to recharge abounds:

  • More positive employee experience: The IBM/Globoforce Employee Experience Index report (citing findings from a global survey of 23,000 employees in 45 countries) found that 77% of workers report a more positive employee experience when they get a chance to recharge when not at work (vs. 42% when they don’t get a chance to recharge).
  • Better performance: An Ernst & Young internal study of their own employees found that each additional 10 hours of vacation resulted in an 8% improvement in year-end performance ratings from supervisors.
  • Higher retention: The same Ernst & Young study found frequent vacationers were less likely to leave.
  • Increased productivity: Lack of sleep translates to a lost work performance of $63.2 billion in the United States.

For me, it’s a bit hard to believe we’re already nearly a full month into 2017. January has been a whirlwind of projects, meetings, inspirations, learnings – all wonderful, yet certainly happening at a rapid pace. I’ve been able to sustain that pace because of my end-of-2016 vacation. A near-total disconnect not just from work, but from the routine of my usual day-to-day. A chance to truly recharge. (And pet ambassador cheetah, Velvet, on safari in South Africa. Who knew cheetah purr?)

How does your organization or your supervisor support your need to recharge? What steps do you take to shut down and restore yourself?

Join us at WorkHuman 2017 (May 30-June 1, Phoenix, Ariz.) to learn more about ways to disconnect, recharge and restore yourself at work. Learn from keynote speaker Susan Cain (author of Quiet Revolution) and Pandit Dasa (mindfulness and well-being expert) among many others. Use code WH17BLG100 when registering for a $100 discount.

2 Steps to Reduce Voluntary Turnover to Zero

by Lynette Silva

Complex call centerRecognize This! – Understanding the importance of the work and the people doing it make work matter and make work more human.

The new year is nearly upon us (and I, for one, am ready to put paid to 2016). With the new year often comes the opportunity for evaluation of our lives and our priorities. Many of us start a new year with new ambitions, goals for change, ideas for improvements. And for some, that means thinking about a new job or a new career.

If I were to ask you, what types of jobs do you think might have people reconsidering their career path I’m willing to bet call center worker likely would appear on your list. Rightly so – call centers rank among the highest turnover jobs in the world at 30-45%. And that adds up to a lot of money (often in the multimillions of dollars) in terms of finding, hiring, training and coaching new inbound customer service representatives.

So what if I told you about a call center with workers who deal with irate customers call after call, day after day, and yet their turnover has been zero – ZERO – for several years?

SpotHero, a startup online company that rents out parking spaces, has figured it out. (Check out the full Planet Money podcast or transcript for the full story.)

1. Recognize the importance of the work being done

All work matters. Otherwise, why bother doing it? And for the customers of the product or service being provided, the work of the providers particularly matters. Yet sometimes we can fall into the habit of elevating one role over another. “Sales is king. Everyone else serves us.” “Product rules! Without a good product, Sales would have nothing to sell.” There’s no good endgame in this attitude, though. Instead, recognizing the importance of every role in creating a powerful whole is what creates organizational success.

Case in point at SpotHero: Their customer service team is called Customer Heroes. Because to the customer in the middle of a problem, that customer service rep is their hero in that moment. As one employee from the Product group explained:

“The rest of us are trying to make a good product and help our company grow. The Customer Heroes are on the front lines making those minute improvements to humanity all the time, all day, every day… We think of them as the heroes of the company because they’re heroes for individual humans out there in the world.”

2. Recognize the importance of the people doing the work

“Being heroes for individual humans” – what a wonderful way to remind people why their work matters. But knowing your work matters isn’t enough. As humans, we also need to know we matter. SpotHero addressed this important point in multiple ways, including capes for their heroes to wear and Hero Appreciation Day. They also strongly acknowledged what it means to work human by providing a room where people could get away after a hard call. To take a break, to reflect, to restore, to rejuvenate. They call that room the Zen Den.

When pressed about why a Zen Den matters, why adding people to reduce call loads wasn’t enough, call center manager Leah Potkin replied:

“Well, where’s the fun in that? Then maybe they won’t be burnt out from how much work they have, but they’ll be burnt out emotionally from just feeling empty and not really thinking their work matters, when the work they do is just so, so important.”

Think about the people you work with every day. Think about your own work. As we wrap up 2016 and prepare for a new year, how can you remind others – and yourself – that your work matters, that you matter?

Secrets to the Holiday Gift Every Employee Wants

by Lynette Silva

Give the gift of thanksRecognize This! – The best gift anyone can give or receive is the gift of thanks.

What’s the most fraught HR decision/situation this time of year? Easy answer – the office holiday party. Setting aside some of the more drama-filled scenes and stories (though I enjoyed Tim Sackett’s holiday party rules), the holiday party is a good way to celebrate a year’s worth of hard work and success as well as an opportunity to strengthen relationships with colleagues.

If the holiday party is the most fraught situation, what’s the second most? I submit, it’s the holiday gift, end-of-year bonus, etc. Why would a gift or a bonus (arguably, both desired by the recipient) be such a challenge? The top reason is because it’s annual. When recognition and rewards are held in reserve, expectations and anticipation often grow exponentially (and out of whack with realities of the business). That’s why frequent and timely recognition throughout the year is a top driver of more human workplaces.

A recent blog post by Ben Eubanks highlights three factors of social recognition that have the most impact on creating a more positive employee experience:

  1. Aligned with Desired Behaviors – How do you need people to behave, every day, in every role? The answer is likely codified in your core values, but do your employees even know what your core values are? (This recent survey says nearly half of employees don’t.) Make it easy for anyone in your organization to recognize and appreciate colleagues for living those values in their daily work. That makes your core values come alive – in people’s hearts as well as their heads.
  1. Differentiated based on Contribution — What did the person do that’s deserving of recognition? Leading a significant project that potentially saves the company millions certainly deserves far more than a pat on the back and casual, “Thanks for all you do.” Instead structure multiple award levels differentiated based on level of effort, contribution, time invested and result achieved.
  1. Appropriate to the Person – Never forget the incredible variability of us humans. What’s personal and meaningful to you (a donation to your favorite charity, perhaps) could be very different than what’s personal and meaningful to me (a runaway escape weekend). Avoid the nightmare of the unwanted (or worse, insulting) gift. True stories include the giving of a steakhouse gift card to a vegan and tickets to the latest hot theater production to a single mom who couldn’t get childcare for the night of the show. Instead, make it fun and easy for the recipients to choose their own meaningful rewards.

Finally, this holiday season, the greatest gift anyone can give or receive is the gift of thanks. Because to say “thank you” means “I see you. I notice you. You are valuable. You matter.”

Who will you give the gift of thanks to this year?

Make Thanksgiving Every Day of the Year!

by Lynette Silva

GloboThanks 2016 - Team photosRecognize This! – A powerful employee experience at work is built on everyday practices of gratitude, appreciation and thanksgiving.

What’s the employee experience like in your organization? How would you describe it (briefly) to others?

After experiencing our latest GloboThanksgiving (where we gather as a team in both our HQ offices in the US and Ireland), I’d have to describe our employee experience at Globoforce as “GloboThanksgiving every day of the year!”

Two things every employee experiences at Globoforce, without question:

  • Gratitude and continual expressions of thanks, appreciation and recognition of contributions, help given, and work well done.
  • Food – lots of food. Sure, food is important as fuel to energize the great work we do. But we also realize food is a powerful way to draw people together informally, to pause in the midst of busy days, to share life, to build closer relationships with colleagues who are much more than co-workers.

Is a holiday office celebration the best way to understand the employee experience in your organization? Perhaps not. But how else do you measure the employee experience?

Our holiday gift to you – for the first time, an index to measure employee experience derived from a global survey of more than 23,000 employees in 45 countries and territories across all job functions for a 5-dimension, 10-item index measuring how employees experience work:

  • Belonging – feeling part of a team, group or organization
  • Purpose – understanding why one’s work matters
  • Achievement – a sense of accomplishment in the work that is done
  • Happiness – the pleasant feeling arising in and around work
  • Vigor – the presence of energy, enthusiasm and excitement at work

If those are the factors defining an employee experience, how can you influence it? First and most importantly, employees are humans with all the complexity that brings. Through the survey, we identified key human workplace practices that drive a more positive employee experience.

Graphic of Employee Experience Index, Drivers and Outcomes

This holiday season, give your employees the gift of a powerful, positive, appreciative employee experience. Read the report here.

 

You Are Not Chopped Liver * The Role of Technology in the People Business

by Lynette Silva

The universe in the palm of your handRecognize This! – Technology, especially HR technology, enables our better human instincts to help us create more human workplaces.

Technology and HR. How does that compute? (Sorry – couldn’t help the pun) Isn’t HR about humans? If the obvious answer is yes, then why is so much effort expended on HR technology? These aren’t trivial questions in terms of investment – in business and in people.

I like a perspective recently cited by CIPD:

“[With technology,] we can really get down to what human resources should have been all along – the job of humanising the rest of the business. There’s never been a better time to be an HR professional because tech is dissolving the supposedly critical routine that kept your vision capped to date.”

That’s the role of tech in the human space – as an enabler of a better, more human workplace and a more positive employee experience overall. Especially in our increasingly distributed workplaces where my closest work colleagues might be physically located half a world away, systems like social recognition facilitate the strengthening of connections and relationships between people through the power of thanks.

Another area where technology can help facilitate our very humanness lies in helping us overcome some of our human nature tendencies that hamper our own success. Case in point (as shared in a Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University article) is squandered work time – time lost to “dysfunctional workplace dynamics—more commonly known as ‘people problems.’”

The researcher/authors of the article describe a study in which rival groups within the same R&D department were given the option of investing budget in the idea of their internal rival or in the idea of an outside competitor. We’d rather a completely external third benefit than the rival we know and feel threatened by.

These very human – if dysfunctional – behaviors cost companies on average $15.5 million.

Are we stuck with the consequences of the more negative tendencies of our humanness? No – in fact, the path forward is by switching on our more positive tendencies. In the example described above, the “shortest path to valuable insights” – and success for the team and company – is often in selecting the rival’s idea. So how do you get people to overcome their human nature and select a rival’s idea? Study co-author Leigh Thompson provides the answer:

“List one or two things you’re particularly proud of. Perhaps you just published a book or a well-received case study; perhaps you had an above-average performance review last quarter. Now all of a sudden, when I hear about the accomplishments or ideas of a colleague, I am more receptive to it—because I have just reminded myself that I am not chopped liver.”

And that brings us full circle to the roll of technology in enabling the employee experience – the human experience. With a social recognition system, it’s even easier to log-in and remind yourself of the tremendous contributions you’ve made (and been praised for by your colleagues).

What are you particularly proud of? What memories or accomplishments remind you of just how valuable you are?

How to Assess Your Company Culture in One Easy Step

by Lynette Silva

People First alwaysRecognize This! – How your employees experience recognition and appreciation for daily efforts and results can determine the success of your organization culture.

Is there an easy and quick way to judge the culture of a company and assess potential for future performance? According to David Novak, former CEO of Yum! Brands, yes. Simply look for telltale signs of a culture of recognition and appreciation at work. (Investor and portfolio manager James Dodson’s Parnassus Workplace Fund bears this out. Companies included in the fund are selected based on how well they care for their employees. The fund regularly outperforms the S&P 500 by 4%.)

How do you create a strong culture built on social recognition? Mr. Novak makes these recommendations:

  1. Put people first

“Focus on their capabilities and recognize what they do to satisfy more customers, build more business, make more money and drive results.”

  1. Tie recognition to what matters most for success

“Recognition can be a catalyst for results if it is directly tied to the important goals and objectives of your organization.”

  1. Make recognition frequent and timely

“One of the most important tasks for any leader is…to make people feel appreciated and respected in their daily work.”

  1. Make recognition meaningful and authentic

“The key is to champion recognition every day and make it meaningful and authentic.”

  1. Energize employees through recognition

“An astonishing 82% of employed Americans feel that their supervisors don’t recognize them enough. That lack of recognition takes a toll on morale, productivity, and ultimately, profitability. In fact, 40% of Americans say they’d put more energy into their work if they were recognized more often.”

This doesn’t mean you can toss off casual, “Hey, thanks. Great job!” comments as you race past a colleague in the hall. Following Mr. Novak’s points above, meaningful recognition makes for a much better understanding of the meaningfulness of work, an important driver of a more human workplace.

HR pro turned consultant Sharlyn Lauby expanded on this in her HR Bartender blog, discussing the need for quality recognition. People want and need acknowledgement of what they did that was deserving of the praise. And it needs to be given sincerely in a way that reflects how the recipient likes to receive recognition. (Please don’t embarrass people.)

Combining the advice, a much better recognition might read:

“Hey, thanks! Great job on the Simpson project. You went above and beyond by taking the time to pull in additional data points I didn’t even know to ask for. That extra detail really helped me out with the client by showing them the ‘proof in the pudding’ of how their own numbers stack up against others on a spectrum of success. Your efforts demonstrated perfectly what we mean when we say ‘Make Customers Happy’ is a core value. Thank you!”

If Mr. Novak walked into your offices, what would his assessment of your company culture likely be?

“The Seventh Sense” – A Book Review and Thoughts on Humanity in the Age of Networks

by Lynette Silva

Book Cover: The Seventh SenseRecognize This! – Our world is highly networked today and will become more so in a more secure fashion. Leaders must help ensure we retain our humanity as we become at once more connected and more secure.

I’ve just finished a book that’s possibly frightened me more than the Exorcist. (And that’s saying something. I didn’t sleep after dark for a week after reading that.) On the upside, the book also gave me my first sense of true hope for how humanity will navigate the coming decades in which we are all far more deeply connected and intertwined – networked – with each other than we likely realize or want to admit.

What’s the book? The Seventh Sense: Power, Fortune and Survival in the Age of Networks by Joshua Cooper Ramo. He’s a futurist who brings his global perspective, deep technical knowledge, and expansive interests to helping us understand not just the way in which the world works, but how and why, too. I picked up this book after seeing it listed by four CEOs in a McKinsey article on “What CEOs are reading.”

What is the Seventh Sense? “A feeling for how networks work that is joined to a sense of history and politics and philosophy.” What does that mean? Essentially this: We are living in a rapidly changing and ever more quickly evolving world due, largely, to the nature of the intense amount of networked connection now common in nearly every function of life – financial markets, food distribution, work/job distribution, biomedical research and development, even terrorism.

A key through line is the idea that connection changes the nature of an object. And by extension, “connection elevates those who control that connection to a level of rare power and influence.”

Another through line is the morphing of the manufacturing era adage of “You can have good, fast, and cheap, but only two out of three at any one time” into the networking age truism of “You can have secure, fast and open, but only two out of three.” In today’s world, we are largely operating in a “fast and open but not secure” environment. If we want more security in our networks and in our lives, then the likely option to give up is open.

How do we gain security in a networked age? By setting up “gatelands” where access is controlled through a clear set of rules and values. Remember, connectivity is power. With that reality, Ramo proposes new geopolitical structures based on “Hard Gatekeeping,” which he defines as “the construction and development of secure, carefully designed communities to manage everything from trade to cyber-information to scientific research.” Ramo points out that today we have very few gates and walls (and tremendous cyber-insecurity). Gatelands may be the answer – gated networks that are far more secure and run faster than open ones. And as an added benefit, gated networks “offer not merely security, but influence: The cost of being exclude from gatelands of finance or information will be nearly total.”

Gatelands are fast and secure, but definitely not open.

How do we retain our humanity in a networked age?

Two basics of what it means to be human are enhanced and even accelerated in this new age.

  • Connection to others (and our trust in them that makes deep connection possible). Trust is another through-line in the book. As Ramo says, “When you connect to a person or an object, you connect as well to its whole history of decisions about whom to trust…. If you are what you are connected to, you are also the sum of every trusting (or untrusting) choice someone or some machine has made.” We may become more cautious or circumspect in our connections overall, but the depth of trust we have in our connections will likely grow.
  • Inevitability of the passage of time and ultimately death. As biological creatures, our mortality is a constant. And yet, a basic human desire is to do more, be more, achieve more with the time we are allotted. Networks can help because they give us the means for tremendous efficiency. Ramo points out, “The compression of time offers the possibility to live more with less time.”

What won’t work? An attempt to return to an isolationist, disconnected structure. The networked age is our current reality. Let’s take as an example the call in the US to build a wall. Set aside for the moment whether the idea is right or wrong and ask instead why the idea seems to be so popular. The obvious answer is fear, but fear of what? Immigrants taking jobs and committing crimes? I don’t think so. The fear runs much deeper than that. It’s a fear of changing expectations and how life works. It’s a very real and reasonable fear based on the realities of the networked age where jobs are very fluid, both in structure and in where they can be done and by whom. Building a physical wall isn’t the solution. In fact, it’s the antithesis. If we want to help resolve the underlying concerns, we need to build stronger connections and more secure gatelands.

A message of hope and instruction from Ramo for those with the Seventh Sense:

“Possession of the Seventh Sense isn’t about just letting the tech do its thing. It is not about passivity in the face of so much power. Rather, it demands grasping the nature of a connected age and seeing how it might be used to further, not erode, the things we care most about.”

Just how networked is our world? Here’s a small, personal example. As I was drafting this post, I received an email from Tim Leberecht, a past WorkHuman speaker. In a brief email exchange, I mentioned I’d just finished this book. He replied with his intent to read it soon as Joshua’s wife is Tim’s friend. Our world has become very small, indeed.

How networked is your corner of the world? What gatelands do you work within today or see as being critically necessary in the near future?

Want to Learn How to WorkHuman? Go to Jail!

by Lynette Silva

Alcatraz

 Alcatraz – Inside the Main Cellhouse, CC BY 2.0 – By Daniel Ramirez, Honolulu, USA

Recognize This! – Respect is a foundational element of working more human, in any work environment.

What’s the most inhumane work environment you can think of? Hard field labor in the blazing sun? Dangerous construction or energy work? After listening to an NPR interview with a Mother Jones reporter who went undercover as a prison guard in a for-profit prison, I’m thinking prison certainly makes the list of potentially the most inhumane work environments. And I’m talking about the conditions for both prison employees and inmates.

If working human means we strive to celebrate the strategic, business and human imperative to bring more humanity back to how we work and how we work together, we would be remiss if we also didn’t consider who we work for. In prison work, the community of law-abiding citizens would ultimately be the customer. I would argue the inmates are customers, too, in that by better serving the inmates as humans in need, we can reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for the greater community when prisoners serve their time and return to that community.

So, how can we make prisons more human for everyone involved – the correctional officers as well as the inmates? Bob Garvey serves as an excellent example. He is sheriff of Northampton, MA, and is retiring after more than 30 years as the superintendent of the Hampshire County Jail and House of Correction. Highlighted in a Boston Globe report, Garvey’s work to honor the humanity – all of the humanity – within the correctional system is inspiring and a lesson in why working more human matters.

Respect Critical in Human Workplaces

Throughout the article, the clear respect officers and inmates have for each other is clear. And it’s that respect that lays a foundation for better outcomes for everyone. Respect shows itself in three ways:

  • Respect for staff and their training needs.

“We’re also trying to create an atmosphere here,” Garvey says, “where the employees feel safe and positive about what they’re doing for the client population… One of the most important things we do is screen the people who want to work here. We want people who aren’t overly aggressive and who really think. All our officers are heavily trained. They know how to de-escalate. We want both sides to respect each other.”

  • Respect for inmates and their human needs.

“They used to think that punishment was cleansing,” Andrea Cabral, former Massachusetts secretary of public safety, said in 2014. “We now know that’s not how humans actually work.”

“Most of these guys come in angry,” [Garvey] continues, “and if they’re angry, addicted, or even hungry, you can’t treat them. To get their attention, you have to get the drugs out of their system, feed them, show them respect, and hope they’ll deliver the same back. And, surprisingly, when they get over the shock of being treated well — at first they think we’re toying with them — they usually do.”

  • Respect for each other’s connection needs.

“Garvey and his staff regularly have meals in the cafeteria with the inmates, sitting at the same rows of shiny stainless steel tables and eating the same food as the inmates… Garvey sees eating together as a way to show that but for different circumstances and behaviors, staff and inmates are all the same. It’s also a way for him to connect.”

What kinds of results can be achieved when we respect the humanity in everyone? In Garvey’s world, the success is clear.

3 Signs of WorkHuman Culture – in Prison

  1. Inmates ask to get in, writing repeatedly to ask Garvey for transfers into his prison.
  2. Inmates see the prison experience as one of the best things to happen to them.
  3. Inmates don’t come back with recidivism at 19% in Garvey’s jail (compared to 60% nationally).

How did Garvey manage to accomplish this? Perhaps it’s because he wasn’t trained in corrections. In a nod to lessons learned in Adam Grant’s latest work Originals, “Garvey’s knowledge of corrections is largely self-taught, which his supporters see as a good thing, allowing him to approach problems in a different way.”

How can you approach WorkHuman challenges differently in your organization? What small teaks could you make to build respect, connections, and ultimately better outcomes?

2 WorkHuman Lessons from the NFL

by Lynette Silva

Bennett BrothersRecognize This! – Working more human requires we allow our humans to be fully themselves, inside and outside work.

You could call me a football fan if, by “fan,” you mean I sit and a read book next to my husband while he watches the Patriots game. But I seem to have picked up more than I realized by this fan-through-proximity method. Being in Patriots country (and a communicator by nature), I’ve noticed how Patriots team members communicate with – or rather, don’t communicate with – the press. And that’s why I was intrigued by this story from ESPN on the Bennett brothers, the younger of whom (Martellus) is now a Patriots tight end. Let’s just say the Bennetts don’t hold back on their thoughts and opinions.

A couple of points in the wide-ranging article really struck home with me, especially from a context of making work more human. Reading the article, even a football neophyte like me can see that working in the NFL, especially as a player, isn’t really an experience of honoring the human at work. That’s why I particularly appreciated these two comments from elder-brother Michael Bennett (defensive end for the Seattle Seahawks).

When bosses “let you be you,” magic happens.

“The Bennetts maintain that, contrary to the beliefs of certain traditionalists, they play better when they’re given the freedom to improvise, both on and off the field. Michael found that equilibrium in Seattle. ‘A lot of white coaches want to be fathers to black players,’ he says. ‘Pete Carroll’s not like – “You gotta tuck in your shirt.”’ He shakes his head. ‘Do you know how much easier it is to work for somebody when you can be yourself? Why do you think Google, Apple and Facebook are so successful? When people can be who they really are, they do so much better.’ The Seahawks, he says, are the Google of the NFL. ‘They let you be you.’”

In a WorkHuman culture, it’s understood everyone can bring much more to the table when we don’t ask our people to pack up parts of themselves and leave it at the door on the way into the office. When we do, we’re often asking them to pack up exactly the parts we need most – their creativity, their passion, their desire to make a difference and an impact.

Making success about more than work makes work more successful.

“Michael says he doesn’t care about making it to the Hall of Fame. ‘Success is measured in so many different ways,’ he says. ‘To me, success is being super happy and enjoying your family. You look at these people who have so much money…and they can’t even be themselves… When I win, I watch a movie with my daughters when I get home. When I lose, I watch a movie with my daughters when I get home.’”

Clearly, I’m no athlete, not even on a casual level. Yet I’m sure when a pro athlete can keep a loss in perspective, rebounding to return and win is easier. Michael’s statement here is a tremendous example of achieving a good work-life balance. It’s all about perspective and remembering priorities. And having the team behind you to make it possible.

What makes work more human for you?

3 Ways to Make Work More Human

by Lynette Silva

WorkHuman NYC CommunityRecognize This! – Regardless of industry or company size, all employees need authenticity, mindfulness and recognition.

Why do we WorkHuman? Simple – how else could we possibly work? We are human, after all. And yet, our workplaces or work experiences often aren’t structured to honor, support or encourage the very humanity we bring to the office.

During the last two weeks, I’ve had the honor and privilege of hosting several WorkHuman Regional Forums across the United States (check out workhuman.com for additional locations and dates throughout the year). The conversation and collaborative learning in these sessions has been enlightening in many ways.

Three recurring themes I’ve seen throughout the conversations in the three local WorkHuman communities to date are:

  1. Authenticity and vulnerability – As Amy Cuddy says, when we are comfortable being our true, authentic selves, we can also be more open and vulnerable with those around us. When we feel safe enough to be authentic, we can bring our whole human selves to work.
  2. Mindfulness and time to pause – Our days are often hectic, dashing between meetings, projects, and priorities. We need time to pause, reflect and process on what was just discussed, accomplished or requested. Building time into the day for short 5-minute reflection and mindful meditation breaks increases focus and productivity. One way to start is simply ending meetings 10 minutes early.
  3. Recognizing the whole human—There is much to celebrate in the people around us. Yet the focus of celebrations is often on the projects or outcomes, and not the humans that delivered the results. Recognizing the people behind the results is critical, as is celebrating the uniqueness each of us brings that creates a far more cohesive and successful whole.

How do we make work more human?

Answering that question is the responsibility of all of us – of any human who has worked, will work, or works today. We owe it to our fellow humans to contribute to a work environment that not only “pays the bills” but also brings us into closer community with others, fulfills our need for greater meaning and purpose from our contributions, and increases our sense of gratitude and appreciation.

How can you join the WorkHuman conversation?

  • Online at WorkHumanCommunity.com.
  • At an upcoming Regional Forum event (August 9 in San Francisco with more cities being added this Fall) – Information and registration available at WorkHuman.com.
  • At the main event in Phoenix, Arizona, May 30-June 1, 2017. (see WorkHuman.com for details)

How does your organization WorkHuman today? What are your priorities for making your workplace more human?