Archive for the "employee experience index" Category

WorkHuman: Disconnect and Recharge

by Lynette Silva

Ambassador cheetah, VelvetRecognize This! – Humans are designed to need to recharge. Work often is not.

What does it mean to be human? A significant part of being human requires shutting off. We need deep sleep for our brains to clear out all the muck, process the day and file it away in long-term memory, and reset for the next day.

Humans need to recharge.

France codified the need to recharge into law, making the “right to disconnect” a requirement for companies with more than 50 employees. (I recommend this post by Tim Leberecht on “Is the ‘Right to Disconnect’ a Human Right?”)

Research on the business impact of making time to recharge abounds:

  • More positive employee experience: The IBM/Globoforce Employee Experience Index report (citing findings from a global survey of 23,000 employees in 45 countries) found that 77% of workers report a more positive employee experience when they get a chance to recharge when not at work (vs. 42% when they don’t get a chance to recharge).
  • Better performance: An Ernst & Young internal study of their own employees found that each additional 10 hours of vacation resulted in an 8% improvement in year-end performance ratings from supervisors.
  • Higher retention: The same Ernst & Young study found frequent vacationers were less likely to leave.
  • Increased productivity: Lack of sleep translates to a lost work performance of $63.2 billion in the United States.

For me, it’s a bit hard to believe we’re already nearly a full month into 2017. January has been a whirlwind of projects, meetings, inspirations, learnings – all wonderful, yet certainly happening at a rapid pace. I’ve been able to sustain that pace because of my end-of-2016 vacation. A near-total disconnect not just from work, but from the routine of my usual day-to-day. A chance to truly recharge. (And pet ambassador cheetah, Velvet, on safari in South Africa. Who knew cheetah purr?)

How does your organization or your supervisor support your need to recharge? What steps do you take to shut down and restore yourself?

Join us at WorkHuman 2017 (May 30-June 1, Phoenix, Ariz.) to learn more about ways to disconnect, recharge and restore yourself at work. Learn from keynote speaker Susan Cain (author of Quiet Revolution) and Pandit Dasa (mindfulness and well-being expert) among many others. Use code WH17BLG100 when registering for a $100 discount.

Make Thanksgiving Every Day of the Year!

by Lynette Silva

GloboThanks 2016 - Team photosRecognize This! – A powerful employee experience at work is built on everyday practices of gratitude, appreciation and thanksgiving.

What’s the employee experience like in your organization? How would you describe it (briefly) to others?

After experiencing our latest GloboThanksgiving (where we gather as a team in both our HQ offices in the US and Ireland), I’d have to describe our employee experience at Globoforce as “GloboThanksgiving every day of the year!”

Two things every employee experiences at Globoforce, without question:

  • Gratitude and continual expressions of thanks, appreciation and recognition of contributions, help given, and work well done.
  • Food – lots of food. Sure, food is important as fuel to energize the great work we do. But we also realize food is a powerful way to draw people together informally, to pause in the midst of busy days, to share life, to build closer relationships with colleagues who are much more than co-workers.

Is a holiday office celebration the best way to understand the employee experience in your organization? Perhaps not. But how else do you measure the employee experience?

Our holiday gift to you – for the first time, an index to measure employee experience derived from a global survey of more than 23,000 employees in 45 countries and territories across all job functions for a 5-dimension, 10-item index measuring how employees experience work:

  • Belonging – feeling part of a team, group or organization
  • Purpose – understanding why one’s work matters
  • Achievement – a sense of accomplishment in the work that is done
  • Happiness – the pleasant feeling arising in and around work
  • Vigor – the presence of energy, enthusiasm and excitement at work

If those are the factors defining an employee experience, how can you influence it? First and most importantly, employees are humans with all the complexity that brings. Through the survey, we identified key human workplace practices that drive a more positive employee experience.

Graphic of Employee Experience Index, Drivers and Outcomes

This holiday season, give your employees the gift of a powerful, positive, appreciative employee experience. Read the report here.

 

You Are Not Chopped Liver * The Role of Technology in the People Business

by Lynette Silva

The universe in the palm of your handRecognize This! – Technology, especially HR technology, enables our better human instincts to help us create more human workplaces.

Technology and HR. How does that compute? (Sorry – couldn’t help the pun) Isn’t HR about humans? If the obvious answer is yes, then why is so much effort expended on HR technology? These aren’t trivial questions in terms of investment – in business and in people.

I like a perspective recently cited by CIPD:

“[With technology,] we can really get down to what human resources should have been all along – the job of humanising the rest of the business. There’s never been a better time to be an HR professional because tech is dissolving the supposedly critical routine that kept your vision capped to date.”

That’s the role of tech in the human space – as an enabler of a better, more human workplace and a more positive employee experience overall. Especially in our increasingly distributed workplaces where my closest work colleagues might be physically located half a world away, systems like social recognition facilitate the strengthening of connections and relationships between people through the power of thanks.

Another area where technology can help facilitate our very humanness lies in helping us overcome some of our human nature tendencies that hamper our own success. Case in point (as shared in a Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University article) is squandered work time – time lost to “dysfunctional workplace dynamics—more commonly known as ‘people problems.’”

The researcher/authors of the article describe a study in which rival groups within the same R&D department were given the option of investing budget in the idea of their internal rival or in the idea of an outside competitor. We’d rather a completely external third benefit than the rival we know and feel threatened by.

These very human – if dysfunctional – behaviors cost companies on average $15.5 million.

Are we stuck with the consequences of the more negative tendencies of our humanness? No – in fact, the path forward is by switching on our more positive tendencies. In the example described above, the “shortest path to valuable insights” – and success for the team and company – is often in selecting the rival’s idea. So how do you get people to overcome their human nature and select a rival’s idea? Study co-author Leigh Thompson provides the answer:

“List one or two things you’re particularly proud of. Perhaps you just published a book or a well-received case study; perhaps you had an above-average performance review last quarter. Now all of a sudden, when I hear about the accomplishments or ideas of a colleague, I am more receptive to it—because I have just reminded myself that I am not chopped liver.”

And that brings us full circle to the roll of technology in enabling the employee experience – the human experience. With a social recognition system, it’s even easier to log-in and remind yourself of the tremendous contributions you’ve made (and been praised for by your colleagues).

What are you particularly proud of? What memories or accomplishments remind you of just how valuable you are?

What’s Ahead for HR in 2017?

By Derek Irvine

doors-1613314_960_720Recognize This! – Trends in HR for the year ahead will emphasize empowerment, the employee experience, and ultimately a more human workplace.

What will some of the big themes be for HR leaders in the year ahead and how can we begin preparing for them? For some answers, I attended a session at HR Tech based on Josh Bersin’s new report, HR Technology Disruptions for 2017.

One of the key findings from that report is a much greater emphasis on empowerment and the whole work environment, increasing the robustness of how we think about employee engagement and cultural fit.  HR technology is playing a large and disruptive role in accelerating this philosophical shift, bringing together sophisticated people analytics, always-on self-servicing, and greater social connection.

These trends deeply resonate with the WorkHuman movement and community. We collectively stand at a pivotal moment for HR to integrate technology and humanity in creating a better workplace and a better employee experience.

It is clear that employees now expect much more out of work, and by extension, many of the HR systems that contribute to the work experience in some way. In Josh’s analysis, we can see how these trends have emerged across HR functions (see his Figure 2: Evolution of HR systems below).

bersin-model

Early technologies aimed to automate and integrate existing processes, streamlining most administrative tasks across benefits and compensation and talent management. Because of that streamlining and perhaps other factors, HR professionals and employees alike began to realize that existing processes were no longer working.

They needed to be fundamentally rethought and rebuilt.

Alongside cloud and mobile technologies, there is now an opportunity to rethink those processes and more fully engage the hearts and minds of employees. There is also an opportunity for HR to move at the speed of business, integrating these processes into the stream of everyday work.

Social recognition is one example that Josh mentions, which empowers all employees to recognize the contributions of others in real time, avoiding the costly process of top-down nominating committees and the pitfalls of having a small “winner’s circle.” Next-gen performance feedback is another area where this kind of empowerment is quickly growing, basing processes in ongoing growth-oriented conversations instead of annual forms or ratings.

Across these and the other emerging “apps that make work life better,” the notion of the workplace is expanding to include more human elements and meeting employee’s expectations for autonomy and control over those elements. These changes will result in a better employee experience, and as research by Globoforce’s WorkHuman Research Institute and the IBM Smarter Workforce Institute has shown, that will lead to better business results.

How is your company preparing for these more human trends ahead?