Archive for the "Social Recognition" Category

IBM Smarter Workforce Institute: Achieve the Power of Thanks through Multiple Recognition Channels

By Derek Irvine

Separate arrows merging into oneRecognize This! – We all know the power of social recognition to engage and retain employees, but when employees have multiple channels to share recognition, the benefits grow exponentially.

The IBM Smarter Workforce Institute (SWI) recently released a report showing the importance of using multiple channels for recognition. The report is based on a survey of 19,000 workers from over 26 countries and shows the Power of Thanks. The more communication channels we use to recognize workers, the better we can reach and thank employees. This thanks leads to higher engagement and retention.

Key findings of the report include (quoting):

  • Employees who receive recognition are more likely to be engaged at work. The engagement level of employees who receive recognition is almost three times higher (76%) than the engagement level of those who do not (28%).
  • Workers who receive recognition are less likely to quit. Without recognition, about half (51 percent) of surveyed employees say they intend to leave, with recognition just one quarter (25 percent) say they intend to leave their organizations.
  • Employees whose organizations use multiple communication channels for recognition are more likely to feel appreciated and show a higher level of employee engagement. The more channels used for recognition, the higher the employee engagement level.
  • The findings imply that technologies such as social and mobile could be strong candidates for the effective delivery of recognition as they offer interactive, frequent and immediate communication via multiple channels.

Why Multiple Channels? More Timely Recognition!

Written and face-to-face recognition were historically the primary methods to thank workers. These channels are not enough to reach employees in today’s global, virtual and mobile workplace. Use of technologies like mobile recognition, online recognition platforms, peer-to-peer recognition videos are critical to keeping high employee engagement levels.

Timely recognition is essential for recognition effectiveness. Mobile apps and other technologies make this far more feasible more than having to wait to get into the office and submit paperwork or logging in through a computer. With a smartphone, recognition can happen anytime, anywhere. This is especially true for overcoming geographic boundaries. IBM SWI points out:

“It has been shown that recognition is more meaningful when it is delivered in a timelier and more frequent manner. By removing the restriction of geographic location and timing, the use of a variety of technology-enabled communication channels can have a positive impact on employees, driven by the fast and frequent delivery of recognition.”

Email Alone Is Not the Answer

Though we know speed and timeliness of recognition matters, email unfortunately continues to dominate (at 58%) as the most common form of technology used for recognition. But email is highly flawed when used as the sole means of “technology-based recognition.”

It does not share the accomplishment of the employee with peers or provide a way to easily track and report on recognition activity in any kind of deep or meaningful way. Truly effective methods are driven by social recognition, involving work communities, online platforms, and mobile apps that share recognized accomplishments with colleagues and work friends to enable a flurry of congratulations on a job well done.

Increase Engagement and Retention

Recognition is a direct, key driver of employee engagement. IBM SWI’s research showed employees who receive recognition are 48% more engaged than those who do not. IBM SWI showed that the more channels used for recognition, the higher the employee engagement.

IBM SWI_Multi-Channel Recognition

Social recognition is key not only to employee engagement, but also to retention. Retention is in the top three challenges facing human resources today. When looking at the link between recognition and retention, 51% of workers who did not receive recognition intended to quit versus only 25% of those who received recognition.

The Time to Evolve Recognition Is Now

If we’re looking to retain, engage, and get the most out of our talent, we have to evolve our recognition strategies to communicate in a manner that is relevant to today’s workplace. IBM SWI concludes their research with this recommendation:

“Based on findings in this study, organizations should consider taking full advantage of varied communication channels in their recognition programs. In particular, social, mobile, and other technologies could be strong candidates for the effective delivery of recognition messages as they enable multiple channels and offer opportunities for interactive, frequent, and immediate communication. If done right, employee recognition programs can unleash the full power of thanks.”

I couldn’t agree more. What recognition channels are you using to recognize your workers? Are you using enough channels? Are you using the right channels?

 

Bersin Says “Thanks” Critical for Employee Engagement

by Derek Irvine

Thank you speech bubblesRecognize This! — There are many drivers of employee engagement, but feedback, recognition and “thanks” lead the charge.

In my last two posts on Compensation Cafe, I shared important research from IBM Smarter Workforce (more on that later this week) and from Bersin by Deloitte. Both are important, detailed pieces of research and so I will be calling more attention to them here.

First up, Josh Bersin authored the research piece “Becoming irresistible: A new model for employee engagement,” which appeared in Issue 16 of the Deloitte Review. This is the new model based on deep research and analysis of organizations across industries:

DR16_irresistibleorganization

In Becoming Irresistible, Bersin says about recognition:

“A second key engagement driver is the need for continuous and ongoing recognition. As soft as it seems, saying “thank you” is an extraordinary tool to building an engaged team. We studied this topic and found that “high-recognition companies” have 31 percent lower voluntary turnover than companies with poor recognition cultures.36 These companies build a culture of recognition through social reward systems (tools that give people points or kudos to reward to others), weekly or monthly thank-you activities, and a general culture of appreciating everyone from top to bottom. The key to success here is to create a social environment where recognition can flow from peer to peer, freeing managers from being the judge and jury of employee recognition.”

Then Bersin expanded on the ideas presented in Becoming Irresistible in a very detailed article in Forbes“Employee Feedback Is the Killer App: A New Market Emerges.” Here he says:

If feedback is the killer app, then ‘thanks’ is the gorilla in the market. When you unleash the ability for people to easily say ‘thanks’ to their peers (and give them points or other rewards), an enormous new network of information often starts to flow. Leaders can suddenly see important people who they may never have noticed, and the culture of helping others can start to grow and improve.

“Our research also found that saying ‘thank you’ is an important part of building strong employee engagement. Many companies tell me that these tools unleash enormous amounts of positive energy and can help people understand even better who and why certain behaviors and people are valued highly.”

I believe this to be a dichotomy of management and a true blind spot — those things we consider easy or obvious, we tend to ignore or subsume. Yet simply saying “thank you” is one of the most powerful means we have to communicate to someone, “I see you. I see the work you do. What you contribute has great value, meaning and purpose, and you do it well.” Truly, there is nothing “simple” in that kind of statement. It is at the heart of what good managers do. Or, to once again quote Bersin from Becoming Irresistible:

It is important for companies to remember that management’s job is not to manage work but rather to develop, coach, and help people.”

And isn’t that the heart of what it means to WorkHuman, too?

What’s the “killer app” in your management toolkit?

Can You Confidently Answer the 4 Basic Performance Management Questions?

by Derek Irvine

4 Question Marks and ConversationsRecognize This! — Wanting to know we’re doing the right things at work is at the heart of performance management – and that’s a good thing.

With the recent news around Accenture and GE replacing their traditional performance review process with more frequent, timely feedback from multiple sources, it seemed Kismet when Eric Mosley, CEO of Globoforce, had his article “Creating an Effective Peer Review System” appear in Harvard Business Review this week.

Eric shares key elements to create, maintain and support a successful real-time peer review program. Click through for the full article for details on each of the below, including examples from top companies who have applied these lessons. (Quoting below):

  • Reflect on core values. Ensure that the metrics on which people are recognized are aligned with your company’s mission.
  • Embrace new technology. Pick a program that is intuitive, easy to use, fun, interactive, engaging, and fully mobile.
  • Explain and celebrate the launch. Position the program as a change designed to help recognize and celebrate employees, and not a new way to monitor or judge them.
  • Get everyone on board. Managers and leaders need to be early adopters.
  • Encourage frequent, timely recognition. Sooner is better when it comes to promoting desired behavior.
  • Empower managers to track results. Give managers access to detailed, real-time, easily actionable reports on recognition activity, correlated to key business goals.

Performance management is necessary, and even desirable. We all want to know:

  1. Am I doing the right things?
  2. Are my contributions helpful to others?
  3. Should I be focusing elsewhere?
  4. Am I adding value?

Helping employees answer those questions is the essence of performance management. Better yet is how GE frames the discussion in terms of coaching. Per this summary of GE’s new approach:

“There’s an emphasis on coaching throughout, and the tone is unrelentingly positive. The [performance development] app forces users to categorize feedback in one of two forms: To continue doing something, or to consider changing something.”

That’s the power of positive reinforcement through coaching people towards more of what you want to see again and away from detractors.

Are you confident in your own answers to the 4 basic performance management questions above?

A Master Class in Recognition Messages from The Daily Show

by Lynette Silva

Daily Show with Jon StewartRecognize This! – Great messages of recognition require details about the meaningful and long-lasting impact the recipient has had on the giver.

Though I usually catch it in replays, The Daily Show is one of my favorite TV shows. I appreciate how it consistently captures the news of the moment, often tackling very uncomfortable subjects with humor, shining a spotlight into sometimes dark and ugly areas that we should be examining more closely.

But this blog isn’t about me extolling the virtues of my favorite shows (and aren’t you lucky our editor wouldn’t let me get away with that anyway). This blog is about sharing best practices, guidance and principles for thoughtful, meaningful and impactful social recognition. And that’s where Stephen Colbert’s send off for Jon Stewart on last night’s Daily Show episode comes in.

Watch the clip below (and apologies for the ad), then my thoughts after the jump. (Email readers, click through for the video.)

The Daily Show Daily Show Full Episodes, More Daily Show Videos, Comedy Central Full Episodes

Why do I call this a master class in recognition messages? Because Stephen hits all the essential elements of a truly impactful, meaningful and memorable message of appreciation:

  • What Jon did – his actions and behaviors – that are deserving of appreciation
  • The long-lasting impact those efforts had on others
  • Lots of specific details to remind Jon of the moments that mattered most

Stephen’s message, in part, was:

“You said to me and to many other people here years ago never to thank you because we owe you nothing. This is one of the few times that I’ve known you to be dead wrong. We owe you because we learned from you. We learned from you by example how to do a show with intention, how to work with clarity, how to treat people with respect. You are infuriatingly good at your job, OK?”

One other aspect to note in the video – the virtuous circle of appreciation started by Jon saying “thank you” to all his collaborators over the years, prompting Stephen’s message of returned appreciation, followed by a huge pile-on of hugs and thanks. That’s the nature of well expressed, well intentioned recognition. It continues to feed on itself, spreading ever outward and engulfing others in the experience of gratitude and praise.

What’s one of the best messages of appreciation you’ve received?

2 Critical Budget Considerations for Employee Social Recognition Programs

By Derek Irvine

Stadium lit up at nightRecognize This! – Budgets must be appropriately established to reach all employees in a differentiated and calibrated way.

“How should I structure an employee recognition program that will have the kind of impact I’m seeking?”

That has to be one of the most common questions I hear when discussing strategy for a social recognition approach that drives desired culture, engagement, productivity and performance. There are several critical factors for success, which we discuss in depth in Chapter 7 of The Power of Thanks. But two foundational aspects deal with how to invest appropriately in recognition and how to use that investment wisely.

1) Set an Appropriate Budget

Approaching recognition as a strategic initiative that drives core organizational goals requires an investment in your efforts. Think of it this way. An inadequate budget for recognition is like trying to illuminate a stadium with a 30 watt light bulb. Sure you can light up a small area well, but the impact of your efforts won’t be felt very widely or deeply. Appropriately funding recognition is like flipping the master switch to light up the entire arena brighter than a noon-day sun. With the right budget, you can touch every employee, in every corner of your organization with the power of appreciation and praise.

So, what is the right level of budget? WorldatWork’s semi-regular Trends in Employee Recognition reports tell us the average continues to be about 2% of payroll. For many organizations, that figure is quite daunting, but consider it can include bonuses, incentives and more that we wouldn’t strictly include in a true social recognition program budget. Instead, think along the lines of what we discuss in The Power of Thanks: “The average… yearly total award spending of about $250 per employee.” That level of budget investment allows for the free-flow of recognition, reinforcing your core values and strategic objectives in the daily work of every employee.

2) Use Your Budget Wisely with Calibrated Awards

Once you’ve established an appropriate budget, using it wisely lets you get the most return on your recognition investment. Key to this approach is offering multiple differentiated award levels, calibrated to level of effort, contribution, time invested and result achieved. Offering calibrated awards ensures people are recognized and rewarded appropriate to their contribution, avoiding the “equal = fair” trap.

Think about the recent news surrounding Gravity Payments, the company that chose to cut CEO salary to pay all employees a minimum of $70,000 annual salary. When first announced, this story garnered much praise. But now, the story isn’t quite so positive. One employee has left because, as a high-performer he felt slighted that those who do not exceed expectations regularly receive the same remuneration as he does.

Differentiation matters. If you step up to lead a major project that ultimately saves the company significant costs, but are recognized with the same level of award as a person who contributed as part of team to a minor project with less long-lasting impact, you will likely feel slighted and overlooked.

Significantly, differentiated awards also let you recognize far more people throughout the year with lower value awards, spreading your budget more broadly and effectively across the vast majority of employees. Superstars still likely receive more of the higher value awards, while your “Mighty Middle” are also recognized for their contributions that make it possible for the stars to shine.

Is your recognition program appropriately funded? Is the budget available used as wisely as possible to touch the most employees with the power of thanks?

WorkHuman Wednesday: Catch Someone Doing Something Good

by Traci Pesch

Cop Eating Breakfast with Homeless Gentleman

Image Credit: TiAnna Greene Facebook

Recognize This! – We all have the power to foster positivity through simple acts of praise and appreciation.

I’ve just returned from a whirlwind vacation with many wonderful new memories created with my family. Vacations are ideal for the opportunity to refresh, rejuvenate and reconnect on a deep and meaningful level with those we love the most. They are also terrific for the ability to just disconnect from the usual daily reality for a while.

That disconnection from what we usually see and experience makes it easier, I think, to spot things we might not normally be looking for. We have different eyes, seeking to see different things. And that’s good. It’s the unexpected that stands out, that sticks with us. Seth Godin commented on his blog:

“The unexpected praise or apology, the one that comes out of the blue, can change everything. It’s easier than ever to reach out and speak up. Sad, then, how rarely we do it when it’s not expected.”

With that in mind, I wanted to call attention to this story in the news about police treatment of those in powerless situations:

“TiAnna Greene was taking her daughter to summer camp one recent morning when she witnessed an act of kindness that took her breath away. While stopped at a traffic light, she saw a Florida police officer sit down on a street curb next to a homeless man and hand him some food and a cup of coffee.

“‘What really caught my attention was the fact she then pulled out food for herself and started to eat with him. She just seemed very, very comfortable,’ Greene said. ‘I got my phone out and started snapping pictures because I was so overjoyed by the interaction.’

“Greene posted the photos on her Facebook page, wanting to share with friends the stranger’s kind act, something ‘that seemed to come naturally for her,’ she said. The post went viral.”

Ms. Greene caught someone (Sgt. Erica Hay) in the act of doing something good. She took a moment to praise Hay’s actions and share that with others. In the process, many others were inspired by the act of kindness. (In fact, Ms. Greene and Sgt. Hay have developed a friendship, according to the article.)

That’s the Power of Thanks, the power of pausing for a moment in our own busy-ness to notice the great work and acts of kindness of others, praise them for it, and share that praise with others. These are the basic tenets of social recognition – notice, recognize, share – and the basis for fostering positivity in groups small and large.

Today, take a moment to “catch someone doing something good.” Who deserves praise in your circle?

Balancing Manager and Individual Responsibility for Employee Engagement

by Derek Irvine

Balancing engagement responsiblitiesRecognize This! – Engagement is an individual choice on a perpetual continuum influenced by leaders and managers, especially.

I’ve been asked a couple of times recently, “Do you think ‘employee engagement’ has become just another business buzzword?”

It’s a valid question and one that often arises from a lack of understanding – what drives engagement and why should we care? Truly engaged employees are “bought in.” They are so passionate about solving the problem, delivering the service, or achieving the goal, they willing invest more of their own time (discretionary effort) to get those results. Does this mean they work overtime? Not necessarily, but they are certainly choosing to use their time far more wisely and efficiently.

One truth about employee engagement, however, is that we all as individuals own our own engagement. Yes, there are numerous outside influences on our choice to engage, but it is up to us. Companies cannot engage us.

In an article last month, Gallup explained:

“Engagement levels tend to fluctuate substantially from team to team and from person to person within the same team… Unless employees assume some measure of responsibility for their own engagement, the efforts of their organizations, leaders, managers and teams may have a limited effect on improving engagement.”

Choosing to Engage Yourself

Why would you want to increase your own engagement? After all, that means you are working harder. Simply put, increased personal engagement means increased satisfaction in what you do, increased energy derived from knowing you’ve done something worthwhile, and increased pleasure in the work well done.

Gallup offers several suggestions on how to go about increasing your own engagement in your work.

“Take responsibility and empower yourself by setting measurable, realistic goals and staying focused on and heading in the right direction to attain them. You will be successful because of who you are, not who you aren’t. By leaning on your unique talents and strengths, you can make the most of each day at work, and engagement will follow. And be sure to celebrate your achievements and keep setting the bar higher.”

If you boil that down to three simple steps:

  1. Define your own engagement.
  2. Use your strengths to form positive engagement habits.
  3. Be accountable to yourself for your success.

Facilitating the Engagement of Others

That said, leaders and managers are not off the hook. Organization leaders and managers can do quite a great deal to influence that personal and individual choice to engage.

The Lighthouse blog on leadership and management offered quite an interesting perspective on this. (I encourage you to read the entire post as it is quite interesting.) They point to several research studies and reports, but in this context I call your attention to the Gallup Cascade Effect chart below. If you’re managers and leaders aren’t engaged, then their employees likely aren’t engaged either.

Chart of Gallup Cascade EffectWhat’s the best thing you can do to increase engagement in your organization? Engage your leaders and managers. Or, as I should say, help your leaders and managers engage first. It’s a virtuous circle that begins with an individual choice. Make that choice easier for everyone, at every level.

  1. Communicate when people are doing well and share that success through social recognition.
  2. Enable everyone to notice and appreciate the good happening around them every day.
  3. Always remember no one is an island. We all contribute to the success of our teams, our customers and our company.

How engaged are you? How engaged is your direct manager? How about your senior leader? Do you see a connection?

3 Characteristics of Superstar B-Players

by Lynette Silva

Brock Holt All-Star JerseyRecognize This! – Not everyone can be on the starting team, but the A-players wouldn’t achieve great success without a roster of strong B-players behind them.

I’m a Red Sox fan. I came by my fandom honestly – I married a diehard Red Sox fan in 2004, and so started watching Sox games in self-defense. (But what a year to start learning the game!) Lately, however, there’s not much joy in Red Sox nation. It’s been a crushingly brutal year.

The one bright spot we have to look forward to is the All-Star Game. (And not only because it gives us a break from watching the near-nightly tragedy unfold.) This year, the only representative from the Red Sox is Brock Holt, a utility player. For the uninitiated, that means Holt isn’t a “starter.” He comes in to cover nearly any position on the field when a teammate is injured or otherwise unable to play. In the lexicon of the typical workplace, Holt is “B-player.”

And that’s why (aside from my fandom) I’m excited to see Holt named to the All-Star team. He earned his slot there. Because whatever position he’s assigned to cover, he performs at top caliber, stepping into the shoes of the superstars and carrying forward with aplomb, grace, and excellence. And keep in mind, Holt isn’t a B-player because he lacks the abilities of an A-player (he has those skills in spades), he simply doesn’t have the spotlight or attention of the more glamorous role of starters on a Major League Baseball team.

I like how the Boston Globe put it:

“The All-Star nod was … an individual honor that happened to come because Holt was doing his job.

“‘I don’t really ever think of anything individually,’ Holt said. ‘I just go out and I play hard for my teammates and my coaches and if people notice that I’m out there doing well, that’s icing on the cake. Like I said, I’m just going to go out and try to play the game the right way and enjoy every second if it because a lot of people don’t get the opportunity that I have to be able to put on a major-league uniform every day — especially a Boston Red Sox uniform. So it’s pretty special to say that’s what you do. But to be selected to this All-star game is pretty cool.’”

What we have in Brock Holt is a superstar “B-player.” I’m willing to bet your organization is chock full of superstar B-players, too. How do you spot them? Look for these 3 traits:

  1. They jump on any opportunity given – Give them a shot at an interesting project or a boring-but-necessary exercise and they’ll leap at the opportunity to contribute.
  2. They deliver results – Completing the task assigned well is the goal, and they do it with a good attitude.
  3. They are committed to the success of the team – Superstar B-players typically aren’t glory hounds. They usually look out for the greater good.

Our challenge as leaders is ensuring B-players get the recognition, praise and appreciation they so richly deserve. Too often, our official recognition efforts are limited to the A-players, forgetting that the A-players can only continue to meet very-high expectations with a solid roster of Superstar B-Players right behind them.

Who are the Superstar B-Players on your team? How are they recognized and celebrated for their contributions and successes?

Why Tracking Employee Recognition Patterns Matters

by Traci Pesch

graphic display of informationRecognize This! – We can learn much about the culture of our workplaces, departments and teams just by deliberately observing and interpreting the pattern of positivity.

We have a new joiner on our team (Welcome, Jessica!) who shared with me this terrific article on how one elementary school teacher is tackling the horror of school bullying one child at a time. As a mother, I was of course interested in this article at face value. But as I read deeper into how this teacher battles bullying, I saw so many parallels to the workplace.

Here’s the method:

“Every Friday afternoon, she [the teacher] asks her students to take out a piece of paper and write down the names of four children with whom they’d like to sit the following week. The children know that these requests may or may not be honored. She also asks the students to nominate one student who they believe has been an 
exceptional classroom citizen that week. All ballots are privately submitted to her.

“And every single Friday afternoon, after the students go home, she takes out those slips of paper, places them in front of her, and studies them. 
She looks for patterns.

“Who is not getting requested by anyone else?

“Who can’t think of anyone to 
request?

“Who never gets noticed enough 
to be nominated?

“Who had a million friends last week and none this week?

“You see, Chase’s teacher is not looking for a new seating chart or “exceptional citizens.” Chase’s teacher is looking for lonely children. She’s looking for children who are struggling to connect with other children. She’s identifying the little ones who are falling through the cracks of the class’s social life. She is discovering whose gifts are going unnoticed 
by their peers. And she’s pinning down—right away—who’s being bullied and who is doing the bullying.”

I read this and hoped for such teachers for my own children. But then, as I read the patterns the teacher is looking for, it reminded me of the similar patterns we also look for through social recognition programs. It’s the same idea, applied to the workforce. It’s the heart of what it means to “Work Human.”

Social recognition, when monitored and tracked appropriately, reveals similar patterns – both positive and potentially negative. Once those patterns are identified, then deeper investigation and possible corrective actions can be more easily taken.

Who is not getting recognized much at all?

  • Do these people work in very independent roles with little interaction with others? If so, what can I do as a manager to recognize their efforts more myself or look for projects in which they can join in with a team?
  • Is there a potential underlying performance issue resulting in little to no recognition? How can those issues be addressed with additional training or development opportunities?

Who is getting recognized but not by members of their own team?

  • Is there a personality conflict going on amongst team members that needs to be addressed?
  • Is the person getting recognized by those outside the team because he is doing a lot of work to help others on their projects? If so, is this a potential career development path as it’s clearly an area of interest?

Who is not recognizing others?

  • Does this person not have the visibility into the work and contributions of others in order to recognize them? How can we broaden their interaction, perspective or (perhaps) sense of ownership and responsibility for recognizing the valuable contributions of others?
  • Do we need to reeducate some on the importance and value of recognition, even for making progress?
  • Is there a culture of fear or an expectation that recognition is for managers only? Do we need to intervene in some departments directly?

Recognition and appreciation are very human needs. We need to know that what we do is noticed, valued and appreciated. Depriving people of the opportunity to either give or receive recognition and gratitude are features of a bully culture. Understanding and overcoming impediments to the free-flow of positivity through recognition are critical to success.

What kind of culture do you work in?

Captain Obvious: Good Bosses Talk with People

by Lynette Silva

Coworkers talking togetherRecognize This! – Not recognizing employee achievements is the top communication issue preventing effective leadership.

Confession time. I like commercials. Well, I like good, engaging, funny or emotional commercials. I cry every time I see that Folgers commercial with the soldier coming home for Christmas. And I actually replay the new UnitedHealthcare commercial of the couple trying to recreate the “lift” dance scene from the movie classic Dirty Dancing. But the commercials that make me laugh the loudest are the Hotels.com Captain Obvious commercials like this one (email subscribers, click through for video):

Why does Captain Obvious appeal to me so much? Because sometimes, we need to be slapped in the face with the obvious to make us realize what’s really important.

So, in the spirit of Captain Obvious, I share this report from Harvard Business Review, including this overall finding:

“91% of employees say communication issues can drag executives down, according to results from our new Interact/Harris Poll, which was conducted online with roughly 1,000 U.S. workers.”

It’s no surprise managers need to talk to their employees. But look at how the needs break down:

HBR Employee Needs for Communications

If you read between the lines, you can easily see what employees are asking:

  • Do you see the work I do? Does it matter?
  • Am I doing the work right? If not, I blame you for not giving me the time or information I need to do good work.
  • Do you even care about me as a human – who I am and what makes me tick?

These aren’t just important workplace needs. These are needs fundamental human needs. I matter. What I do matters. I am seen. I am heard. I am valued.

Managers who can meet these needs as well as inspire their employees to do the same for their peers and colleagues find themselves with highly engaged, highly productive, highly motivated teams. Those of us who get to work for managers like that are, in turn, highly blessed.

Think about the best manager you ever had. What made them so good?

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