Posts Tagged "employee recognition’

Integrating the Robots into a More Human Workplace

By Lynette Silva

Recognize This! – AI can help us realize our humanity more fully in the workplace.

Robots at WorkIt’s that time of year – the World Economic Forum at Davos. This year’s theme is “Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World,” which covers a lot of ground. Most interesting to me is seeing the proliferation of discussions around the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and creating more human work environments.

Accenture Strategy released a report at Davos, summarized in this Economic Times article:

“If businesses invest in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and human-machine collaboration at the same rate as top-notch companies, they could boost revenues by 38 percent by 2022 and raise employment levels by 10 per cent, a new report said on Tuesday. Collectively, this would lift profits by $4.8 trillion globally over the same period.”

Christian Ulbrich, Global CEO at JLL, led a panel on “why human experience in the workplaces of the future will be even more central to the success of high performance businesses, despite the rise of the robots.” As he commented in a LinkedIn prelude to the session:

“We see evidence all around us of advances in technology and big data transforming our work and lifestyles. What’s becoming equally apparent in the workplace, as a complementary counterpart to digitalization, is a strong recognition of the importance of human experience … Across all business sectors, we see growing recognition of the vital importance of community in the workplace. We don’t need a scientific study to know that being part of a community is energizing. But why? The key, I think, is shared meaning and values, which in turn instill a shared sense of purpose.”

So, where’s the intersection? One seems to be talking about empowering the robots (AI) while the other is talking about empowering the humans. The secret lies in acknowledging the path to the future while remembering the humanity at the core of our work, our workplaces and our coworkers. As Ellyn Shook, Accenture’s chief leadership and human resources officer, said at Davos:

“Business leaders must take immediate steps to pivot their workforce to enter an entirely new world where human ingenuity meets intelligent technology to unlock new forms of growth.”

Let’s think about how that might play out in a social recognition system in your organization. There’s nothing more human than the act of saying “thank you,” the effort of noticing others and their contributions while expressing your appreciation to them. And yet, applying AI to knowledge inherent (and often hidden) in meaningful messages of thanks can reveal great potential in an organization, in a team, and in an individual.

Ellyn will be joining us at WorkHuman to share more on the intersection of AI, humans, and potential in the workplace. I hope you can join us, too, April 2-5, 2018, in Austin, Texas.

How do you see creating a more human workplace intersecting with the reality of greater AI?

How to Assess Your Company Culture in One Easy Step

by Lynette Silva

People First alwaysRecognize This! – How your employees experience recognition and appreciation for daily efforts and results can determine the success of your organization culture.

Is there an easy and quick way to judge the culture of a company and assess potential for future performance? According to David Novak, former CEO of Yum! Brands, yes. Simply look for telltale signs of a culture of recognition and appreciation at work. (Investor and portfolio manager James Dodson’s Parnassus Workplace Fund bears this out. Companies included in the fund are selected based on how well they care for their employees. The fund regularly outperforms the S&P 500 by 4%.)

How do you create a strong culture built on social recognition? Mr. Novak makes these recommendations:

  1. Put people first

“Focus on their capabilities and recognize what they do to satisfy more customers, build more business, make more money and drive results.”

  1. Tie recognition to what matters most for success

“Recognition can be a catalyst for results if it is directly tied to the important goals and objectives of your organization.”

  1. Make recognition frequent and timely

“One of the most important tasks for any leader is…to make people feel appreciated and respected in their daily work.”

  1. Make recognition meaningful and authentic

“The key is to champion recognition every day and make it meaningful and authentic.”

  1. Energize employees through recognition

“An astonishing 82% of employed Americans feel that their supervisors don’t recognize them enough. That lack of recognition takes a toll on morale, productivity, and ultimately, profitability. In fact, 40% of Americans say they’d put more energy into their work if they were recognized more often.”

This doesn’t mean you can toss off casual, “Hey, thanks. Great job!” comments as you race past a colleague in the hall. Following Mr. Novak’s points above, meaningful recognition makes for a much better understanding of the meaningfulness of work, an important driver of a more human workplace.

HR pro turned consultant Sharlyn Lauby expanded on this in her HR Bartender blog, discussing the need for quality recognition. People want and need acknowledgement of what they did that was deserving of the praise. And it needs to be given sincerely in a way that reflects how the recipient likes to receive recognition. (Please don’t embarrass people.)

Combining the advice, a much better recognition might read:

“Hey, thanks! Great job on the Simpson project. You went above and beyond by taking the time to pull in additional data points I didn’t even know to ask for. That extra detail really helped me out with the client by showing them the ‘proof in the pudding’ of how their own numbers stack up against others on a spectrum of success. Your efforts demonstrated perfectly what we mean when we say ‘Make Customers Happy’ is a core value. Thank you!”

If Mr. Novak walked into your offices, what would his assessment of your company culture likely be?

Adiona: Making Employee Recognition Mobile, Social, and Global

By Derek Irvine

smartphone-1445489_960_720Recognize This! — Social recognition is well suited to enable business success in response to growing trends in globalization, social networking, and mobile technology.

The modern organization has been drastically transformed in recent years by the confluence of three major trends, each of which has had a large impact on how employees expect to interact with one another. Global boundaries have disappeared, social connectivity has become easier, and mobile technologies have enabled both greater freedom and access.

In an article in the July issue of Adiona Magazine, I analyze the impact that these trends have had on the workplace. It’s an important issue, especially as businesses face stiffer competition for top talent and look to sustain their competitive advantage.

One of the ways in which companies can successfully navigate these trends is through social recognition. A social recognition solution can balances the flexibility desired by a dynamic workforce with a consistent “one company, one culture” framework that improves efficiency and effectiveness.

Here are just a few excerpts from the larger article that help to illustrate that point:

“Thinking globally and acting locally is necessary… [but] it takes the right technology and the right global knowledge to work.” When these two things are in place, recognition can resonate across the world, as boundryless and as fast as the work that is being recognized, and aligned to a single set of shared core values.

As the workplace becomes more social, “recognition reinforces the attitudes that facilitate cooperative work… and encourage all to contribute.” And much like social networks, recognition can provide a timeline of all employees’ contributions and provide data to uncover pockets of excellence and hidden patterns of performance.

Finally, as employees are increasingly on the move, they “need the power to recognize and receive appreciation on the go, [which is] key to ensuring an engaged and motivated workforce.”

Companies that effectively leverage these practices will be well-positioned to compete in today’s business environment and better prepared to leverage their workforce to adapt to future changes.

How has your company used recognition to respond to the changing world of work?

How Recognition Makes WorkHuman

by Lynette Silva

Coffe mug with foam in shape of a smileRecognize This! – We all have the ability to create more human workplaces for ourselves and those around us, simply by saying thank you.

Recently we released our WorkHuman Research Institute Spring 2016 report, The ROI of Recognition in building a More Human Workplace,” assessing the attitudes and expectations of those fully employed from their workplaces today. (Be sure to tune in Thursday, April 14, for Derek Irvine’s discussion with Sharlyn Lauby of the findings of the report. You can register for the webinar here.)

The report is quite detailed, offering “a blueprint for what practices will drive employee behavior, attitudes, and business results. Specifically, [how] employee recognition is a foundational element of building a human workplace.” To me, the greatest value in the report is in the questions it answers, which I’ve highlighted here.

Why is recognition such a foundational element for building a human workplace?

A human workplace is one that fosters a culture of recognition and appreciation while empowering individuals, strengthening relationships, and providing a clear purpose aligned with achievable goals. Social recognition is vital for many reasons, especially for:

  1. What it communicates – Recognition lets people know, “You are noticed. You and your work have value and meaning.” The research reveals the WorkHuman connection – when employees believe organization leaders care about creating a more human workplace:
    • 90% say work they do has meaning and purpose
    • 78% feel like opinions, voice and ideas matter to leaders
  2. How it helps build relationships – The act of appreciating others naturally connects people more closely, at work and at home. In the survey, 70% of employees say recognition makes them feel emotionally connected to peers while another 70% say recognition makes them happier at home. Timeliness of the recognition matters, though. When recognized in the last month, 86% of employees say they trust one another, another 86% say they trust the boss, and 82% say they trust senior leaders. Again, the WorkHuman connection is clear – when employees believe their leaders care about creating a more human workplace:
    • 93% feel they fit in and belong in the organization
    • 91% say they are motivated to work hard for my organization and colleagues
  3. How it boosts performance and productivity – Knowing our work is valued and appreciated by others naturally makes us want to contribute more. 79% of employees say recognition makes them work harder, and 78% say recognition makes them more productive. Interestingly, recognition also helps employees feel better equipped to handle the constant change common in today’s workplaces, which is often a detriment to productivity. When recognized in the last month, 69% of employees say they are excited or confident about change, vs. 41% saying the same who had never been recognized. What’s the WorkHuman connection? When employees believe their leaders care about creating a more human workplace, 90% say they are able to find a solution to any challenge.

Perception is reality. How our employees perceive their own recognition and their leaders’ commitment to human workplaces dramatically impacts the bottom line.

 

And a final bonus question – do you work in a human workplace today, and if not, what would need to change?

 

Creating a Culture that Recognizes “Originals”

by Derek Irvine

Person wearing bear claw shoesRecognize This! — Recognizing cultural contribution instead of cultural fit is a valuable way to reinforce the contributions of “Originals.”

I recently caught a piece on the Marketplace Morning radio program, interviewing Adam Grant (one of our WorkHuman speakers from 2015!). He was sharing some of the interesting findings from his new book, Originals.

I think like most of us, Adam initially expected that the nonconformists at the center of the book- the ones driving innovation and upturning the status quo- would be passionate and risk-taking types. What he found instead was that these people were often quite cautious, hedging their bets and thoroughly thinking through alternatives before moving forward.

When asked what these findings mean more broadly for organizations, Adam said something that really stuck with me. He recommended that companies need to move away from hiring for “cultural fit” and towards hiring for “cultural contribution.”

This was almost as counter-intuitive as his previous findings, especially given how many companies emphasize the importance of fit when hiring. I am paraphrasing, but Adam’s argument is that fit can only give you more of the same without really adding anything new. There will be a temporary boost in motivation and solidarity when new workers join, but that boost quickly dissipates. In its place is the danger that the organization will be susceptible to groupthink and ill-equipped to adapt to future changes.

Cultural contribution, on the other hand, seeks to find those new hires that can add something to the culture that already exists- to find the gaps, identify what is missing, and strive to strengthen it. This is a key take-away for me: helping companies identify, hire, and support these original thinkers, particularly when they may not look like what we commonly expect but can contribute to the health of a company’s bottom-line.

Extending this thinking beyond hiring, there is ample opportunity for organizations to encourage “Originals” in the scope of everyday work.

Simply put: we start recognizing for cultural contribution instead of just for cultural fit.

This means that senior leadership, managers, and employees are not only invested in reinforcing their culture, but doing so through strengthening and improving it. It means giving everyone the ability to recognize employees who may express contributions to a company’s culture in new and different ways, expanding the definition of what it means to work according to core values. Given the potential diversity in ways that individual employees may successfully enact a given cultural value, recognition is particularly impactful in communicating the value of that diversity.

Recognition provides a pathway for organizations to apply Adam’s latest findings and actually encourage the contributions of “non-conformity” as a way to enhance a shared notion of culture.

How does your organization recognize cultural contribution?

What Type of Realist Are You?

by Derek Irvine

Trees in color and B&WRecognize This! — Whether you favor a competitive or humane workplace, or something in between, a culture of recognition can be valuable.

More and more is written these days about the best ways to interact with each other in the workplace. And more and more, very different camps are forming and battle lines being drawn to convince you which techniques and tactics are superior.

In one camp are what I call the brutal realists. These are the folks that are proud of cutthroat cultures and believe in the inherent, zero-sum competition of business. They praise things like radical candor, tournament based policies, and Darwinian cultures to improve performance.

In the other camp are the humane realists, and they have taken a very different stance. These folks see the workplace as a place to come together, collaborate, and win by supporting those around them. They favor approaches to the workplace that center on gratitude, compassion, and empathy.

I imagine you already have in your head a clear picture of each of these very different work scenarios, and also an evaluation of which one you believe is superior. That evaluation is probably reflective of your own personal style, which no amount of research on the efficacy of the opposite approach could convince you to change. It is probably also reflective of a long history of self-selection into contexts, organizations, and bosses that fit with your personal style. Can you imagine the discomfort and lack of fit for a brutal realist in a compassionate organization, or a humane realist in an ultra-competitive one?

Still, I wonder how many organizations fall so neatly into either of these archetypes. Clearly there are unique standouts that get media attention, but I suspect they are the exception rather than the rule. What about the organizations that occupy the middle of the spectrum, balancing a need to compete with a need to have coworkers successfully relate to one another? I would love to see more written about these cases and their guiding philosophies towards structuring the relationships among their workforce. What do they do that works, and are there any trends that characterize this middle of the pack?

Developing a culture of recognition realists can be one successful path to this middle ground. These people believe in the power of recognition to address the humane aspects of the workplace, allowing coworkers to express appreciation and gratitude towards one another, strengthening social connections. They also believe in the power of recognition to address the competitive aspects of business, rewarding coworkers who achieve high performance and devote extraordinary effort while demonstrating corporate values.

A social recognition program can also be structured to reinforce a company’s existing culture wherever it falls on the spectrum, providing emphasis on those culturally valuable aspects of interaction between employees. Positive feedback and coaching on performance, building collaborative relationships, or any other value that lends competitive advantage can be included into the process of providing recognition.

Where does your organization fall on the spectrum and how does that equate to success?

Why Is that Last Mile Such a Challenge?

Photo of long empty roadby Derek Irvine

Recognize This! — Aligning individual behavior to core values can be a challenge, but recognition is one way to win over that last mile.

Those who know transportation logistics or supply chain management are very familiar with the “last mile problem.” Fans of online retailers may also have some personal experience with this challenge: a package is sitting in a distribution center in the next town over instead of on your doorstep. The last mile refers to that short amount of distance between a major hub and a product’s final destination, often a disproportionately costly portion of the entire shipment.

There is an analog to this problem in the business world when it comes to executing strategy.

Many organizations can readily develop a strategy for their business, one that ties their mission and ambitions to the larger competitive context. Executives spend a lot of time getting the strategy right, and then communicating it to their divisional leadership. These leaders are subsequently tasked with making the strategy actionable, creating initiatives and business plans to deliver on key goals. The “last mile” involves the challenge of aligning individual employee behavior to the strategy and initiatives, as the final part of the cascading process.

As in transportation, figuring out how to win in the last mile is often a challenge.

What is one key to success in cultivating the right employee behaviors? It turns out that a company’s values are critically important. In fact, ModernSurvey found that close to 60% of employees say that their organization’s values actually guide their behavior at work. As Patrick Lencioni has written, “values can set a company apart from the competition by clarifying its identity and serving as a rallying point for employees.” They are a cohesive force that aligns the “last mile” micro dynamics (rallying of individual employee behavior) with macro dynamics (organizational identity and strategy).

Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean values are necessarily easy to get right.

As Lencioni continues, “coming up with strong values- and sticking to them- requires real guts.” So what makes a set of company values strong? I’ve addressed this topic previously, but two components from that post bear repeating. Strong values have:

  • Internal strength, ensuring that values are truly core values that remain central over time. Differentiated from either aspirational or accidental values that can draw leaders’ attention astray, core values lend meaningfulness and context to the set of behaviors that are expected to achieve organizational outcomes.
  • External strength, or the extent to which employees understand and are able to act upon those values as a rallying point. This means more than having a set of values on a plaque on the wall. Values are given external strength when employees behave in a values-consistent way every day, and are recognized for that behavior.

If core values are clear and employees are empowered to act upon them, the last mile will be won.

Social recognition offers a powerful tool for reinforcing alignment to core values, much like other technologies have been leveraged to solve the last mile challenge in transportation. It can bring values down off the wall and into the hearts and minds of employees, establishing sets of behaviors that are immediately recognized and shared across people. It is the mechanism that reinforces continuous cycles of values-aligned behaviors, ultimately resulting in greater engagement and returns.

What has your experience been over the last mile of aligning employee behavior?

What To Do With All These Trends?

by Derek Irvine

Arrows pointing opposite waysRecognize This! – Trends are often captivating, but it takes a unified vision to see how they all can fit together to work for you.

If you are anything like me, you enjoy the articles of trends to watch in 2016, what HR should look like in 2020, and what the blue chips are up to. There are so many interesting ideas, it can be hard to know what to pay attention to, let alone what might be a fit for your own organization’s style, culture, and strategy.

In a Perfect World…

Imagine you are given free rein as an HR professional for your company over the next year. You are free to develop and implement anything and everything you have dreamed. Where do you start and what do you do?

Now, and more importantly, how do you tie it all together into something cohesive? What’s your aligning vision or goal for everything you want to accomplish?

This is an especially important question to answer, but all too easy to miss. These forecasts can have an à-la-carte feel. Adopt this practice, tweak this system, analyze that data. This is possibly a symptom of the sheer complexity of what HR is tasked with these days.

Regardless, our goal should be to look for the connections between data points and trends, pressures from the external environment, and alignment between business needs and HR services. We must connect the items on any list into a cohesive perspective of business reality today and how we can improve in the future.

Bringing It All Together

Linda Mougalian’s TLNT article, “Top 4 Trends,”  is a powerful example of this approach. She identifies four crucial trends for HR professionals in the coming years. Among them are rethinking annual performance reviews, improving culture and engagement, adopting new talent sourcing methods, and refining analytics to drive better decisions.

In each, Linda focuses on a foundational concept that unites the set of trends: leveraging relationships and data through social technology. In our imagined scenario, this would be my aligning vision.

Here’s how it all fits together:

  • Building an engaged culture by connecting people to one another, a culture in which they can recognize the contributions of others in helping the team and the company deliver on its core values. Social technology provides the “virtual watercooler” – as well as the data and reporting capability – that makes it all work.

Everything else the business or HR does should flow from there:

  • Reviewing performance is grounded in these relationships, and the day-to-day work those relationships produce. Social technology provides more immediacy and frequent feedback, as well as the ability to track that relationship data.
  • Transmitting the value of your culture and relationships to the external talent market, leveraging social media channels to spread the word. In the words of Josh Bersin, “becoming irresistible.
  • Finally, leveraging data analytics about the social fabric of the organization in terms of ongoing collaboration, movement of key talent, and retention of high performers.

A culture of recognition is crucial in harnessing these trends towards more integration of relationships and data through social technologies. Whatever your specific unifying vision, it is highly likely that some part of the WorkHuman movement will be at its core.

What trends do you see as driving your company forward, and how are they all connected?

Many Thanks for 2015: Favorite Posts

by Derek Irvine

Best 2015 medallionRecognize This! — WorkHuman, The Power of Thanks, and many more exciting developments from 2015 lead to a promising 2016 to come.

2015 has been a whirlwind year of exciting launches and new beginnings. As we look forward to 2016, I’m pausing to look back at some favorite 2015 RecognizeThis! posts and the memories they spark.

WorkHuman – the highlight of my year. This movement marks a watershed in how we think and talk about people in the workplace. In a WorkHuman world, we focus more on the people doing the work, how they are organized and come together to achieve a shared mission, emphasizing the role of employee wellbeing, purpose, and happiness. As part of that, I had the privilege of serving as emcee of the first WorkHuman event, leading to this post:

 WorkHuman 2015: What’s the Opposite of Saying “Thanks?”

As I shared in the kick-off of WorkHuman, the opposite of saying “thanks” is saying nothing at all. It’s having the opportunity to communicate to someone how much they and their efforts are appreciated and valued, but choosing not to. Saying nothing when thanks are deserved is like carbon monoxide seeping through your home. What’s unseen and unheard can be deadly to your culture.

(Did you miss the excitement? Join us for WorkHuman 2016.)

2015 also saw the launch of our newest book, The Power of Thanks. A guideline for structuring powerful, positive cultures of recognition, it also serves as a reminder of our own personal roles in promoting thankfulness – at work and at home. These two posts are excellent reminders of the power of thanks to us all.

The Power of Thanks Is in Us All, if We’re Willing to Share It

I’ve noticed that being immersed in a culture of recognition has turned me into a far more appreciative person in all aspects of my life, at work and at home. It’s impossible to train yourself to pick up your head out of your own little world to notice the efforts and contributions of others at work and then not do the same at home, too. Often, without realizing it, I’m far more complimentary of the people I interact with as I go about life – grocery store cashiers and personal friends, gas station attendants and family members – who they are doesn’t matter so much as the humanity they represent. We are all built needing to hear praise and appreciation from others. I’m just glad I’ve learned skills to do that better.

“Good Job” – 2 Most Harmful Words in the English Language?

This line did leave me wondering, though, about the words we use to recognize others. Despite being a fixture in our lexicon, “good job” alone hardly qualifies as bona fide recognition. So, while not the most harmful two words in the English language, maybe in the most literal and generic sense “good job” isn’t really quite good enough at all. Recognition should be impactful and memorable and leave the recipient with a positive connection between the words spoken or written and their own actions. Overused and vague phrases alone like “good job” or “thanks for everything” or “congrats on your success” with no substance don’t quite fit the bill.

And that’s the crux of the lessons from 2015 – it’s all about our relationships with others that make us more effective, happier and productive in what we do. These last posts bring that message forward powerfully.

Why Peer Relationships Matter at Work

Clearly, our peers are fundamental to how we get the work done. Yet all too often, peers and their observations are ignored or lessened in an employee recognition experience. Managers are given the opportunity to share their appreciation, which is valuable and very important, too, of course. But let’s not ignore both the power of peers and their more direct insight into their colleagues’ contributions and achievements.

Cultures of Recognition Don’t Create Themselves

A recent client scorecard on recognition program activity highlighted key learnings as they’ve achieved a milestone in social recognition availability. We see these key learnings across customers as they are fundamental for most any company to achieve their own ambitions for recognition. Here they are as reported by our customer along with my own additional comments.

  1. “Building a culture of daily recognition and appreciation doesn’t happen overnight. [Our recognition program] puts the power of thanks into the hands of our employees (or into their mobile devices).”
  2. “[Recognition program] adoption, as measured by unique nominators and unique recipients, is highest when senior leaders express, model, and reinforce the importance of recognition.  When senior leaders use [the recognition program] to recognize employees, we see increased usage.”
  3. “Senior leaders who have used [the recognition program] to recognize employees have been surprised and amazed to receive heartfelt thank-you responses.”
  4. Communication is key to success. When we use well-placed messaging, we see an immediate increase in [recognition program] usage.

And finally, my deepest appreciation and thanks to you, our readers of RecognizeThis!, for your added comments and thoughts that make this endeavour a two-way sharing of knowledge. My best wishes for a wonderful 2016 to all.

China Gorman on the Role of Trust in Changing Cultures and Creating Great Places to Work

by Andrea Gappmayer

Great Place to Work LogoRecognize This! – Strong, supportive, successful company cultures are built on a strong foundation of trust, pride and camaraderie in relationships at work.

As a Senior Recognition Strategist and Consultant at Globoforce, I have the opportunity to meet and work with fascinating people every day. China Gorman, the former CEO of Great Place to Work® Institute, is one of those people. In June, we announced that China has taken on the role of Chair of the Globoforce WorkHuman Advisory Committee. We could not be more thrilled.

It was my honor to present an interview-style session with China Gorman at the Evanta CHRO Leadership Summit in San Francisco.

The first question I asked, because I knew it would be on the forefront of everyone’s minds was, “What traits do you see consistently in Great Place to Work® organizations?”

China explained that Great Place to Work methodologies measure three key relationships within the organization:

  1. Is the relationship between employees and their leaders founded in trust?
  2. Is the relationship between employees and their work one that makes employees proud?
  3. Is the relationship between employees in their work group one of camaraderie?

You could see people throughout the room internally asking themselves these questions. Some people nodded; most of them grimaced. Acknowledging the reality of your work culture isn’t easy, but it has to happen. And the realization of the work involved to change the culture can be daunting.

“Does employee appreciation play a role in Great Place to Work organizations?” I asked.

China’s response? “100%, absolutely.” Employee appreciation is a key driver of trust. If the relationship between employees and leaders isn’t founded in trust, how can a winning culture thrive? And how can an organization be productive and profitable when their culture isn’t thriving? Simple answer: it can’t.

A key point that China stressed repeatedly is that culture change absolutely must come from the top. Without executive support, it just isn’t going to happen. Using real world examples of leaders who were able to turn their cultures around, China drove home every point she made. Many people approached her afterwards thanking her for the insight. They appreciated the stories and examples because it gave them ideas in how to change their own culture and the confidence to make it happen.

For the rest of our interview, China had more insight and facts on driving employee appreciation, creating trust, and generating a Great Place to Work culture. Unfortunately, a short blog can’t capture all of the information. Nor can it reflect the atmosphere and energy of the session.

Did you have a company that needed a culture reboot? How did you implement change?